Sleep Disorders and Chronic Constipation: Relation to Other Co-morbidities?



S. L. Szeinbach*, 1, R. Rodriguez-Monguio2, R. W. Baran3, P. B. Williams4
1 Division of Pharmacy Practice & Administration, College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
2 School of Pubic Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA and The Insti-tute for Global Health, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA
3 Global Health Economics, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA
4 Medical School, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, USA


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© 2010 Szeinbach et al.;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at Division of Pharmacy Practice & Administration, College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Tel: (614) 688-4249; Fax: (614)529-5070; E-mail: Szeinbach.1@osu.edu


Abstract

Sleep disorders are common complaints and frequently associated with a number of disease states. Although the link between sleep disorders, respiratory diseases, and other co-morbid conditions experienced by patients has been investigated, the link between sleep disorders and chronic constipation is relatively unexplored. Given the widespread occurrence of sleep disorders, it is important to evaluate how sleep disorders relate to respiratory diseases and other comorbid disease states in participants with chronic constipation. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify co-morbid conditions that were significant predictors for chronic constipation participants with and without sleep disorders. Of the 311 participants with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic constipation, 84% of the sample was female with 52% having sleep disorders, approximately two-thirds reported allergies, and 30% or less reported chronic sinusitis, chronic bronchitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results from logistic regression analysis revealed significant odds ratios for sleep disorders and allergies (OR 2.4; p = 0.001), asthma (OR 2.0; p = 0.01), chronic bronchitis (OR 2.2; p = 0.014), COPD (OR 4.0; p < 0.001), sinusitis (OR 2.0; p = 0.008), and for other co-morbid conditions. Perceptions of overall health were significantly worse (p < 0.001) for chronic constipation participants with certain co-morbid conditions including sleep disorders, respiratory diseases, and disease states producing pain. Co-morbid conditions may influence information provided by patients when discussing family history, diagnosing, discussing pharmacotherapy, and monitoring patient-reported outcomes. Co-morbid conditions should be considered by physicians and specialists during patient assessment and evaluation.

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